Dating asians in minnesota Free sex type chat rooms

11-May-2016 12:05

Note: The census figures released last week focus on population differences from 2011 to 2012.

The numbers in this table and the table below reflect population changes over a 10-year period, from 2000 to 2010.

Blacks make up the state’s largest minority group, followed by Hispanics, Asians and American Indians.“We do well as a group,’’ says Sia Her, new executive director of the Council on Asian Pacific Minnesotans.

But keep in mind, Her says, that the Asian Pacific community is made up of groups from more than 40 countries.“Look at Asian Indians and Chinese communities,” she says. Then look at some of the most recent arrivals: Hmong, Karen, Karenni, a small ethnic minority from Burma.’’ Her is of Hmong descent.

Census data shows Asians to be the fastest growing ethnic group in the state, their numbers driven by immigrants pursuing high-tech jobs and young families having babies.You’ll find, she says, they are culturally different in many ways and vary in health, income, educational attainment, whether they are immigrants or refugees, whether they’re first generation immigrants or more established here.“There are big differences, but similarities as well, the ties that bind us,’’ Her says, pointing to Asians groups’ tendency to focus on the importance of family, traditional gender expectations and Asian parents’ expectation their children will succeed. The city leads the state with 7.22 percent of its population being Asian and Wilder has an established history of serving that population.What’s unique about the Asian population is its “tremendous diversity’’ on many fronts, explains state demographer Susan Brower.Take, for instance, the fact that 82 percent of Asian Indian Minnesotans have bachelor’s degrees or higher compared to 14 percent of Hmong, the largest Asian group in Minnesota, Brower said Friday.Income closely follows educational attainment, with about one-third of Hmong Minnesotans living in poverty compared to about 3 percent of Asian Indians.

Census data shows Asians to be the fastest growing ethnic group in the state, their numbers driven by immigrants pursuing high-tech jobs and young families having babies.You’ll find, she says, they are culturally different in many ways and vary in health, income, educational attainment, whether they are immigrants or refugees, whether they’re first generation immigrants or more established here.“There are big differences, but similarities as well, the ties that bind us,’’ Her says, pointing to Asians groups’ tendency to focus on the importance of family, traditional gender expectations and Asian parents’ expectation their children will succeed. The city leads the state with 7.22 percent of its population being Asian and Wilder has an established history of serving that population.What’s unique about the Asian population is its “tremendous diversity’’ on many fronts, explains state demographer Susan Brower.Take, for instance, the fact that 82 percent of Asian Indian Minnesotans have bachelor’s degrees or higher compared to 14 percent of Hmong, the largest Asian group in Minnesota, Brower said Friday.Income closely follows educational attainment, with about one-third of Hmong Minnesotans living in poverty compared to about 3 percent of Asian Indians.“A large proportion of our Asian population is facing some pretty serious barriers,’’ Brower says.