Internet dating sad stories

18-Jun-2015 09:26

Matthew Kassel’s New York Observer piece about his frustrations with online dating is sad, endearing, and very good.In short, he argues that OKCupid, Tinder, and their ilk encourage an endless series of first dates that don’t really go anywhere.Finally, despite grand claims to the contrary, it is unlikely that any matching algorithm based upon data collected before people have encountered each other can be effective at identifying partners who are compatible for a long-term This doesn’t mean online dating is useless.The researchers do highlight some positives, most notable among them the facts that it offers access to potential partners that real-life interaction might not, and that it can be a useful way of sifting out people who would definitely be badmatches.

His complaint has merit that extends beyond his own experiences: Researchers generally think that online matchmaking algorithms do a poor job of determining who will be a compatible long-term You really know nothing about a person when you arrange a first date with someone through an online source,” said Harry Reis, a professor of relationship psychology at the University of Rochester.“Imagine if you were to pick names out of the telephone book and go on a first date.After all, it involves (in most cases) looking through someone’s profile to make sure you have enough stuff in common, and/or sending a bunch of messages before agreeing to meet inperson.But as it turns out, the information gleaned from profile-perusing or chatting isn’t actually all that predictive when it comes to long-term romantic prospects.How many of those do you think you’d feel a sense of connection with?

His complaint has merit that extends beyond his own experiences: Researchers generally think that online matchmaking algorithms do a poor job of determining who will be a compatible long-term You really know nothing about a person when you arrange a first date with someone through an online source,” said Harry Reis, a professor of relationship psychology at the University of Rochester.

“Imagine if you were to pick names out of the telephone book and go on a first date.

After all, it involves (in most cases) looking through someone’s profile to make sure you have enough stuff in common, and/or sending a bunch of messages before agreeing to meet inperson.

But as it turns out, the information gleaned from profile-perusing or chatting isn’t actually all that predictive when it comes to long-term romantic prospects.

How many of those do you think you’d feel a sense of connection with?

Probably very, very At first glance, this doesn’t make sense — of course online dating is less random than picking names out of a phone book.